There are no claims made here of being truly original, tweaked innovation from years of imitation; constantly evolving because the competition is too.
Although I used to run a fairly decent online magazine, I have never taken time to write on Tumblr. I noticed when I started this blog, I wanted to only post my photography, because I really didn’t want to just become one of those mindless reblogging blogs. I wanted to offer something new. Yet, oddly enough, there were just certain posts that I couldn’t help but share, and propagate around the web for others to hopefully appreciate. As a result, I’ve been a bit of a hypocrite and I haven’t put up much of my work lately, it’s just been re-blogging unfortunately — except for my short film (see few posts below). This picture that I took which you see above, captures for me, what a lot of photography should be — capturing a moment that occurs only once. I think the digital movement in photography has a lot of pros, but one con is the loss of spontaneity of photography. Everyone is so concerned about having that cute new profile picture that they retake and retake and retake and they can’t find beauty in what they have. This photo that I took, as I’m sure many will agree is no where nearly my best in terms of technique, but it encapsulates the day where everyone from the white house to the outhouses of the world read about Bin Laden’s death.The greatest photos in history remain eternal because they captured a moment, not because they were necessarily the best in terms of technique. Even lately, I’ve put down the prime lenses for a bit, and just shoot around with a few disposable cameras. The results are not only a surprise, but they are appreciated because they capture a real moment, they capture a greater feeling. Now I’m not saying ditch digital because my Nikon is my baby, but I’m saying that we should remember one of the essential points and joys of photography — to capture a moment.

Although I used to run a fairly decent online magazine, I have never taken time to write on Tumblr. I noticed when I started this blog, I wanted to only post my photography, because I really didn’t want to just become one of those mindless reblogging blogs. I wanted to offer something new. Yet, oddly enough, there were just certain posts that I couldn’t help but share, and propagate around the web for others to hopefully appreciate. As a result, I’ve been a bit of a hypocrite and I haven’t put up much of my work lately, it’s just been re-blogging unfortunately — except for my short film (see few posts below). This picture that I took which you see above, captures for me, what a lot of photography should be — capturing a moment that occurs only once. I think the digital movement in photography has a lot of pros, but one con is the loss of spontaneity of photography. Everyone is so concerned about having that cute new profile picture that they retake and retake and retake and they can’t find beauty in what they have. This photo that I took, as I’m sure many will agree is no where nearly my best in terms of technique, but it encapsulates the day where everyone from the white house to the outhouses of the world read about Bin Laden’s death.The greatest photos in history remain eternal because they captured a moment, not because they were necessarily the best in terms of technique. Even lately, I’ve put down the prime lenses for a bit, and just shoot around with a few disposable cameras. The results are not only a surprise, but they are appreciated because they capture a real moment, they capture a greater feeling. Now I’m not saying ditch digital because my Nikon is my baby, but I’m saying that we should remember one of the essential points and joys of photography — to capture a moment.

  1. okamiii posted this